courses

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 102: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    This first-year course is about developing “anthropological eyes” through which to interpret and understand humankind in all of its diversity. Using examples from different countries and communities, this course introduces basic anthropological concepts and addresses key contemporary social and cultural issues. This course is intended to form the foundation for further exploration in cultural, social, medical, linguistic, and applied anthropology.

  • Astronomy

    ASTR 210: Exploring the Universe: The Solar System

    A survey of discoveries about the planets and other objects in the solar sytem, without the use of advanced mathematics. The solar system, the existence of planets around other stars, and the search for life.

  • Biology

    BIOL 112: Unicellular Life

    The principles of cell biology using bacteria as examples or unicellular organisms. Cell structure and function, from DNA replication to protein synthesis, with emphasis in genetic engineering applications.

    BIOL 121: Biology I

    This course is an introduction to our current understanding of genetics, incorporating the most important themes ranging from DNA and gene function, to model organisms and human diseases, and finally the interactions of organisms with their environment through the earth’s history. A strong emphasis is placed on scientific method, hypothesis development and testing, and these will be put to practice in a multi-part lab component.

    BIOL 150: Human Anatomy & Physiology I

    After finishing the course, the student will be able to: explain basic concepts in human biology and physiology. Explain the structure and function of organ systems outlined in the course content. Analyze the interconnection between different organ systems, such as nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscular and skeletal.

    BIOL 151: Human Anatomy & Physiology II

    After finishing the course, the student will be able to: Explain basic concepts in human biology and physiology. Explain the structure and function of organ systems outlined in the course content. Analyze the interconnection between different organ systems, such as nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscular and skeletal.

    BIOL 140: Laboratory Investigations in Life Science

    Introductory experimental biology focused on experimental design, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology.

  • Business

    BUSN 292: Organizational Behaviour

    As an introductory core course in Organizational Behaviour, this course covers topic areas of understanding individuals in the workplace, communicating decisions, designing and changing organizations, and leading others.

    BUSN 204: Operations Management and Logistics

    This is an introductory course in Operations Management and Logistics. An organization's ultimate success depends on how efficiently and effectively it executes its strategic goals. This requires a detailed understanding of the processes used to produce and deliver goods and/or services to customers. This course will provide students with the managerial tools needed to understand and articulate the impact of an organization's business processes, and the ability to analyze and continuously improve these business processes.

    BUSN 205: Introduction to Management Information Systems

    Introduction to Management Information Systems (MIS) Information Systems is an exciting and rewarding field, and I hope you are looking forward to our class. The purpose of Management Information System (MIS) is to provide an overview of the role of information technology (IT) and management information systems (MIS) in an organization. Little background is required and the course is for the most part self- contained.

    BUSN 290: Intro to Quantitative Decision Analysis

    An introduction to a number of quantitative methods of solving decision-making problems in the industry. This course integrates applied business research and descriptive statistics. The course also develops concepts of uncertainty, probability and simulation which are the foundation of many business problems.

    BUSN 291: Applications of Statistics in Business

    This course integrates applied business research and descriptive statistics. Examination of the role of statistics in research, statistical terminology, the appropriate use of statistical techniques and interpretation of statistical findings in business and research will be the primary focus. Topics include confidence interval, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, and analysis of variance. Business data is analyzed using Excel spread sheets. Emphasis is on understanding, interpreting statistical information and explaining statistical ideas to non-specialists. This course uses assigned readings, lecture, discussion, exams and a project wherein participants plan to apply concepts and strategies as the teaching/learning format.

    BUSN 294: Managerial Accounting

    This course focuses on the use of accounting information in efficiently operating an organization. The concepts are sufficiently general to be applicable in both profit and not-for-profit organizations, but most of our discussion will deal with profit-oriented firms. The course seeks to develop analytical skills in decision-facilitation and decision influencing.

    BUSN 295: Managerial Economics

    The economic foundations of managerial decision-making: supply and demand interactions, decision-making under uncertainty, production and cost, price determination under perfect competition and monopoly, strategies for pricing with market power, monopolistic competitive, oligopoly, game theory, asymmetric information, agency, market structure. This course uses a variety of mathematical techniques, particularly graphs, algebra, and calculus.

    BUSN 296: Introduction to Marketing

    An introduction to the field of marketing, students will develop marketing knowledge and skills applicable to all areas of study within business.

    BUSN 297: Social Media Strategy

    To succeed in today's economy, organizations must incorporate social media into their marketing and business strategies. In this course, students examine the role of social media today and how to use it to meet organizational goals.

    BUSN 298: Introduction to Finance

    An introduction to financial valuation and quantitative analysis of corporate and individual financing and savings decisions.

    BIOL 140: Laboratory Investigations in Life Science

    Introductory experimental biology focused on experimental design, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology.

    BIOL 112: Unicellular Life

    The principles of cell biology using bacteria as examples or unicellular organisms. Cell structure and function, from DNA replication to protein synthesis, with emphasis in genetic engineering applications.

    BIOL 121: Biology I

    This course is an introduction to our current understanding of genetics, incorporating the most important themes ranging from DNA and gene function, to model organisms and human diseases, and finally the interactions of organisms with their environment through the earth’s history. A strong emphasis is placed on scientific method, hypothesis development and testing, and these will be put to practice in a multi-part lab component.

    BIOL 150: Human Anatomy & Physiology I

    After finishing the course, the student will be able to: explain basic concepts in human biology and physiology. Explain the structure and function of organ systems outlined in the course content. Analyze the interconnection between different organ systems, such as nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscular and skeletal.

    BIOL 151: Human Anatomy & Physiology II

    After finishing the course, the student will be able to: Explain basic concepts in human biology and physiology. Explain the structure and function of organ systems outlined in the course content. Analyze the interconnection between different organ systems, such as nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscular and skeletal.

  • Chinese Languages

    CHIN 101: Mandarin for Beginner I (Non-Heritage)

    A beginner level Mandarin Chinese course for students who have little or no previous Chinese experience. This course is designed to equip learners’ with basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese through interactive classroom activities, language lab and online practices as well as exploring some key components of Chinese culture and customs.

    CHIN 102: Mandarin for Beginner II (Non-Heritage)

    CHIN 102 is a continuation of CHIN 101 for students who have taken CHIN 101 or equivalent. The course is designed to further equip students with communicative language skills for listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese in real life Mandarin speaking environment. Students will learn about 250 more Chinese characters for reading and writing.

  • Classical Studies

    CLST 102: Introduction to Roman Civilization

    An introduction to the history, archaeology, literature, and philosophy of ancient Rome, paying particular attention to the Late Republican and Early Imperial periods. This course will address a variety of themes pertinent to the period, including Roman social, political, and religious structures and values; art and architecture; and the impact of developments in literary and philosophical thought. Readings will be assigned from both primary and secondary materials.

    CLST 101: Introduction to Greek Civilization

    An introduction to the history, archaeology, literature, and philosophy of ancient Greece, paying particular attention to Fifth-Century Athens. This course will address a variety of themes pertinent to the period, including Athens’s relations with and attempts to shape its physical environment; Athenian religion, values and morality; the social and political structures of the city; the city’s military campaigns; and intellectual and cultural developments. Readings will be assigned from both primary and secondary materials.

    CLST 201: Classical Mythology

    Greek and Roman mythology and its interpretation, with an emphasis on ancient texts read in English translation. Art and archaeology of the classical world will also be considered. The course gives students a basic introduction to some of the theories and methodologies of comparative mythology and historiography. It provides useful background for further studies in classical studies, art history, English, comparative religion and cultural anthropology.

  • Communications

    CMNS 150: Introduction to Journalism

    (None)

    CMNS 202: Media Literacy and Democracy

    (None)

    CMNS 205: Introduction to Communication Strategies for non-Profits

    The course will introduce students to the basics of a number of distinct areas including basic communications strategies, crisis management, marketing plans, event planning, and public relations enabling students to participate in an informed way in non-profit communication events. As such it lays a solid foundation for further study and entry into a career in the non-profit sector.

    CMNS 210: Digital Media Design, Development, and Usability

    This course broadly explores the foundations of design and development of digital media through a course-long project. Working in balanced teams, students will rapidly iterate project changes as they incorporate new design and usability understanding. At the end of the course, each student should have a portfolio-ready project.

    CMNS 212: Project Management in Digital Media

    Project Management in Digital Media introduces the general concepts of project management skills for those who work in the development and production of various projects for non-profits. In this course, you will explore project development processes and formulate strategies to manage projects. You will develop an awareness of the issues faced by non-profits, the challenges of selecting technologies, and the relative costs of development and will formulate your own set of best practices for developing and managing projects.

    CMNS 102: Introduction to Communications

    This course develops the reasoning and communication skills for civic agency in Canada, recognizing the richness of our social diversity. It explores the leading global and Canadian public policy issues and how information on these issues is shaped and communicated. Students will be required to engage with pivotal social issues, analyze the arguments at play, and formulate their own reasoning for public exposition.

  • Computer Science

    CPSC 121: Methods of Computation

    Course Information explores formal modeling systems that help us to understand and to explore the capabilities of computers and, more generally, of any problem solving process.

    CPSC 110: Computation, programs and programming

    This course offers fundamental program and computation structures. The course takes you through introductory programming skills exploring computation as a tool for information processing, simulation and modeling, and interacting with the world.

  • Criminology

    CRIM 200: Psychological Explanations of Criminal Behaviour

    A detailed study of psychological approaches to explaining recidivist criminal behaviour. Some of the specific theories subject to critical examination will include: psychoanalytic, behaviourism, social cognitive, developmental, and Eysenck’s theory of personality and crime. Theoretical and empirical approaches will be utilized to explain the behaviour of offenders involved in various crimes (property, violent, etc.).

  • Economics

    ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

    Elements of the theory of microeconomics and of Canadian institutions and policy concerning markets, market behaviour, prices, costs, exchange of trade, competition and monopoly, and distribution of income.

    ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics

    Elements of the theory of macroeconomics and of Canadian institutions and policy concerning the cycles of business and economic growth, national income accounting, interest and exchange rates, money and banking, and the balance of trade.

    ECON 201: Principles of Microeconomics

    Elements of the theory of microeconomics and of Canadian institutions and policy concerning markets, market behaviour, prices, costs, exchange of trade, competition and monopoly, and distribution of income.

    ECON 205: Current Canadian and Global Economic Issues

    This course studies current global economic issues which impact the Canadian economy. These issues relate mostly to international trade, exchange rates and capital flows but can include environmental issues such as global warming, shifts to clean and renewable energy, political instability in countries with trade and other relationships with Canada, formation of regional trading areas such as USMCA, and the shift of trade from developed to emerging economies. Other relevant topics covered include the behavior of world interest rates and changes in global financial institutions or reserve currencies.

    ECON 206: Money and Banking

    The course introduces students to the economics of money, banking and financial markets in the Canadian context. It covers areas of financial markets, financial Institutions, management of financial institutions, central banking and the conduct of monetary policy, international finance and monetary policy. Specifically, it analyses a broad range of topics including the behavior, risk and term structure of interest rates; financial structure and regulations; banking and management of financial institutions; the central bank and roles played the banking systems during the financial crises; the central bank’s use of monetary policy to influence the economy; and the principles of foreign exchange market in international finance.

    ECON 202: Principles of Macroeconomics

    Elements of the theory of macroeconomics and of Canadian institutions and policy concerning the cycles of business and economic growth, national income accounting, interest and exchange rates, money and banking, and the balance of trade.

  • English

    ENGL 099: Introduction to Academic Writing Skills

    Students study and practise critical reading skills and academic writing skills, including generating ideas, creating thesis statements, outlining, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. Students apply the writing process to the composition of paragraphs and short essays.

    ENGL 110: Academic Reading, Writing and Thinking

    This is a first-year, first-semester course that integrates critical reading, thinking, and composition. Students learn how to apply principles of rhetoric, analysis, and academic writing in oral and written responses to selected readings. Through a progression of increasingly challenging assignments, students develop their discursive skills through expository writing and academic argument.

    ENGL 120: Introduction to Literary Genres

    This is a first-year, second-semester course, which introduces students to the major literary genres: prose fiction, poetry, and drama. Through a study of selected texts, students learn and practise the fundamentals of university-level literary study and the skills to think and write critically about literature. The course is designed to prepare students for more specialized courses in English at the second-year level.

    ENGL 150: Academic Research and Writing

    This is a first-year course that introduces students to academic research and writing. Each section focuses on a specific topic and explores how knowledge on that topic is produced and communicated in different disciplines. Designed to familiarize students with the methods, motives, and discursive moves of scholarly inquiry and conversation, this course will involve students in reading and critically evaluating peer-reviewed sources, writing in a variety of academic genres, communicating their own research, and reviewing the work of peers. As apprentice scholars, students will be expected to have reading and writing skills appropriate to university-level discourse, and to uphold the standards of academic honesty, including responsible citation practice.

    ENGL 216: Contemporary Children's and Young Adult Literature

    (None)

    ENGL 228: Literature and Visual Arts

    ENGL 228 (3) Literature and Visual Arts In this course students will study the historically complex relationship between literature and the visual arts as it manifests itself in the works of literary and visual artists in Britain, North America and beyond. Students will study autonomous visual works inspired by texts, visual works intended to remain within a written text as visual companions to it, writers influenced by visual art traditions and theoretical positions, and authors who are both visual and literary artists and thus practitioners of both “languages.”

    ENGL 230: Classical and Biblical Texts and Literature

    English literature has been profoundly influenced by the language, genres, narrative patterns and imagery of Biblical and classical writing. This course surveys a number of the most important works of these two traditions, including The Odyssey (Homer), The Aeneid (Virgil), and various readings from the Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament. It also explores how themes and forms from these works have been taken up in literature in other time periods. This course is loosely structured around the human concerns of home, belonging, and exile that emerge across time, from the ancients to the twentieth-century.

    ENGL 231: English Literature to 1750

    Students in this second-year course study works by a number of major British authors before 1750. The course forms a foundation for the further study of English literature, and is required for an English Major at many universities, including the University of British Columbia. Historical and literary backgrounds are discussed for all of the texts. Of particular interest is the interrelationships between different modes of performance both at the time of the works’ composition and currently.

    ENGL 232: English Literature 1750-1900

    An exploration of English literature by studying and writing upon selected works from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The major focus of this course is the continued evolution of the various literary genres as they reflect and record the development of ideologies and ideas.

    ENGL 233: Canadian Literature

    The study of selected works of Canadian writers, including fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction prose, from the colonial period until the present. Ethnic, immigrant, and First Nations literature may all be included.

    ENGL 234: American Literature

    The study of selected works of American writers, including fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction prose, from the colonial period until the present. Ethnic, immigrant, and Native American literature may all be included.

    ENGL 240: Bard on the Beach: An Introduction to Shakespeare and Contemporary Performance

    This class is an introduction to Shakespeare and performance. As such, students will not be expected to have a background in Shakespeare studies or performance studies and we will spend a lot of time unpacking and explaining Shakespeare’s sometimes complex and counter intuitive language and plots. By the end of this class, however, students should learn techniques that will help them understand the four plays that we are studying and Shakespeare’s oeuvre in general.

    ENGL 252: Celtic Mythology

    This course introduces students to the pre-Christian beliefs and practices of the ancient Celtic peoples, ranging from ancient Gaul to early-medieval Ireland and Wales. Sources examined are both literary and archaeological. The course also gives students a basic introduction to some of the theories and methodologies of comparative mythology. It provides useful background for further studies in medieval history and literature, comparative religion, and cultural anthropology.

    ENGL 253: Introduction to Arthurian Literature

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the Arthurian literary and legendary cycle over a broad sweep of time, from its origins in early medieval Wales to its continued popularity today. It covers the early development of some of the central characters and narrative elements in Wales, the flowering of the romance cycle in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the “codification” of the legends by Malory in the fifteenth century, and the significant revival of interest in Arthur in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This course provides useful background for further courses in medieval studies and English literature.

    ENGL 290: Literature and the Visual Arts

    In this course students will study the historically complex relationship between literature and the visual arts as it manifests itself in the works of literary and visual artists in Britain, North America and beyond. Students will study autonomous visual works inspired by texts, visual works intended to remain within a written text as visual companions to it, writers influenced by visual art traditions and theoretical positions, and authors who are both visual and literary artists and thus practioners of both “languages.”

  • English - Creative Writing

    CRWR 202: Creative Writing II

    This second-year course is a seminar/workshop in the techniques of imaginative writing and in the development of a critical appreciation of the art of writing in its varied forms including formal verse poetry, longer fiction, and longer dramatic works.

    CRWR 201: Creative Writing I

    This second-year course is a seminar/workshop in the techniques of imaginative writing and in the development of a critical appreciation of the art of writing in its varied forms, including free verse poetry, short fiction, and short dramatic works.

  • Film Studies

    FILM 210: History of Cinema I (1895-1930)

    The course covers the history and historiography of cinema’s formative years. Lectures and weekly screenings investigate the technological, narrative, and artistic developments from 1895 through the transition to sound.

    FILM 220: History of Cinema II (1930s to the Present)

    This course examines the expansion of the modern cinema, its modes of production, and its role as a manufacturer of culture. These issues (and others) are discussed within a comparative context in which the dominant practices of the American film industry are contrasted to developments in World Cinema. Emphasis is placed on the achievements of directors who are representative of major trends, genres and styles of each historic period.

    FILM 233: Introduction to Film Production

    This intensive introductory course provides an immersive introduction to the exciting world of professional film and media production. It covers the technical aspects of film production from the perspective the crew (and creatives) involved in making film and media using today’s HD cameras and professional editing equipment throughout the course.

    FILM 283: Introduction to the Screenplay

    Drawing on Aristotle’s six elements of drama, students learn to identify and employ the “poetics” of screenwriting as they analyze screenplays and write their own. Students are introduced to cinematic narrative, including act structure, character development, dialogue, as well as, the correct cinematic application of plot, setting, theme, tone, and genre.

    FILM 100: Intro to Film and Media Studies

    Intro to Film is a course designed to introduce you to the language, theory and aesthetics of film. During this course, we will focus on thinking critically and writing intelligently about film. As we view a broad spectrum of film styles and genres from cinematic history, we will explore cinemas role as an artistic, social and meaning-­making force. Our aim is to present new ways of understanding, analyzing and appreciating film and all its visual, aural and narrative conventions.

  • Fine Arts

    FINA 102: Introduction to Acting

    (None)

    FINA 225: Western Art and Architecture: 200-1600 CE

    A selective survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture of Europe from the late Classical period through the Renaissance.

    FINA 101: Introduction to Theatre

    This course explores the theory and practice of the theatrical arts. This is accomplished by studying the history of theatre and by reading plays that illustrate the ways that theatre has developed from the amphitheatres of ancient Greece to the stages and film sets of the present.

  • French

    FREN 111: Introductory French II

    (None)

    FREN 103: Introductory French I

    French grammar and composition, culture, reading and oral practice. FREN 103 is the first in a four-course series intended to bring the student’s language level to at least the equivalent of French 12. Not open to students with credit for French 10.

  • Geography

    GEOG 103: Introduction to Physical Geography: Landforms and Vegetation

    A study of the physical and biological processes governing the evolution and distribution of landforms, soils, and vegetation of the Earth, and the impact of humans. This course is an introduction to geomorphology, the scientific study of the landscape and landscape formation processes. In the course, students will be introduced to the physical structure of the earth, earth materials, the nature and formation of major landform features on the earth's surface, and the processes that continue to shape the landscape as rivers, oceans, glaciers, winds, earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis.

    GEOG 206: Geography of British Columbia

    This course is designed to acquaint students with the physical, economic, historical, and human characteristics of the various regions in British Columbia.

    GEOG 102: Introduction to Physical Geography: Weather and Climate

    A study of the basic principles of climate, hydrology, geomorphology, and biogeography, including human induced changes. Laboratory exercises required.

  • Geology

    GEOL 114: Earth's Natural Disasters

    An introduction to the causes and effects of natural disasters, in Canada and around the world. The course surveys the geologic (solid earth, oceanic and atmospheric) understanding of hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, avalanches and floods, hurricanes and tornadoes, droughts and wildfires, extraterrestrial impacts and mass extinctions. The history and socio-economic effects, as well as possible prediction and risk management, are studied in light of the human capacity/requirement for stewardship of our planet Earth.

    GEOL 105: Introduction to Physical Geology

    A study of the principles and processes by which the materials and parts of the earth originated and have subsequently undergone changes; the origin and dynamic of our ever changing earth, the ultimate products being the continents, oceans, and their inhabitants; human impact on the geologic environment. Field study required.

  • History

    BIOL 112: Unicellular Life

    The principles of cell biology using bacteria as examples or unicellular organisms. Cell structure and function, from DNA replication to protein synthesis, with emphasis in genetic engineering applications.

    BIOL 121: Biology I

    This course is an introduction to our current understanding of genetics, incorporating the most important themes ranging from DNA and gene function, to model organisms and human diseases, and finally the interactions of organisms with their environment through the earth’s history. A strong emphasis is placed on scientific method, hypothesis development and testing, and these will be put to practice in a multi-part lab component.

    BIOL 150: Human Anatomy & Physiology I

    After finishing the course, the student will be able to: explain basic concepts in human biology and physiology. Explain the structure and function of organ systems outlined in the course content. Analyze the interconnection between different organ systems, such as nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscular and skeletal.

    BIOL 151: Human Anatomy & Physiology II

    After finishing the course, the student will be able to: Explain basic concepts in human biology and physiology. Explain the structure and function of organ systems outlined in the course content. Analyze the interconnection between different organ systems, such as nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscular and skeletal.

    BIOL 140: Laboratory Investigations in Life Science

    Introductory experimental biology focused on experimental design, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology.

    HIST 100: Early Medieval Europe

    The influence of Classical, Germanic, and Slavic traditions and the impact of Christianity on the development of medieval Europe.

    HIST 101: Later Medieval Europe

    This course introduces students to the later medieval history of Europe, covering the period dating roughly from the year 1000 A.D to the beginning of the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to characteristic institutions and ideas in this period, including changes in the medieval church and Christianity, the evolution of political and social structures in Europe, and developments in education and scholarship. Attention will also be paid to the ongoing influence of forces outside Europe on medieval life and activities.

    HIST 105: Pre-Confederation History of Canada

    This course examines the history of the territories and colonies that became Canada. It begins before European-First Nations contact and ends in 1867, at Confederation. Given the extensive time and space covered by this course, we will focus on three questions which have shaped the country Canada is today:

    HIST 106: Post-Confederation History of Canada

    This course explores the history of Canada since Confederation [1867]. Topics include national expansion, Aboriginal and Metis resistance, economic cycles, and two world wars. The course also considers the ways in which the lives of the diverse peoples of Canada have been transformed by industrialization, urbanization and immigration, and affected by race, class, gender and region.

    HIST 110: Indigenous Peoples in Colonial North America

    This course examines indigenous North America from pre-European contact through the mid-19th Century. It focuses on the history of indigenous peoples and nations within the present-day boundaries of the United States and Canada (Turtle Land). Emphasis will be placed on appreciating the diversity of traditions and pasts experienced by the many nations of Turtle Island and to work against monolithic treatments of this topic. This course will proceed chronologically from the contact period through the establishment of European colonies and settlements to consider especially how native peoples responded to these developments. Themes include cross-cultural collaborations across linguistic and spatial divides, the clash between settler and indigenous economies, political and religious systems and the relationship native peoples developed with other racialized groups. Special attention will be paid to the complex relationship native peoples have had with European forms of Christianity over time.

    HIST 111: Indigenous Peoples in Late 19th and 20th Century North America

    This course examines indigenous North America from the mid-late 19th Century through the early 21st Century. It focuses on the history of indigenous peoples and nations within the present-day boundaries of the United States and Canada (Turtle Island). Emphasis will be placed on appreciating the diversity of traditions and pasts experienced by the many nations of Turtle Island and to work against monolithic treatments of this topic.

    HIST 200: Europe from Renaissance to French Revolution

    An introduction to the history of early modern Europe, outlining the main periods and surveying some of the major political, intellectual, social, economic, and artistic developments that shaped European history from the close of the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century.

    HIST 201: Europe from French Revolution to Present

    An introduction to the history of modern Europe, outlining the main periods and surveying some of the key political, intellectual, social, economic, and cultural developments that shaped European history from the French Revolution to the reunification of Germany and the fall of Soviet communism in the late twentieth century.

    HIST 203: Classical Islamic Civilization

    An introduction to the Classical period of Islamic history, from the birth of the Prophet Muhammed in 570 to the fall of Baghdad to the Mongols in 1258.

    HIST 204: Islam from the Mongols to the Modern Day

    A study of the early modern and modern history of the Muslim world, beginning with the Mongol conquests of the mid 13th century and ending with the modern day. The course demonstrates how the Muslim world has developed into the form it has at present, enabling students better to understand the events and issues that they see making headlines today.

  • Latin

    LATN 102: Introductory Latin II

    (None)

    LATN 101: Introductory Latin I

    (None)

  • Latin American Studies

    LAST 100: Introduction to Latin America: A Land of Constant Conquest

    This course offers an historical overview of Latin America from the pre-conquest civilizations to the present. From the Aztec’s original lust for land and labour through to modern transnational corporations, Latin America has been in a constant state of conquest.

  • Leadership

    LDR: Leadership 100*

    Get hands-on leadership training, access key resources, and take an active role in a leadership activity of your choosing - all in a supportive environment. Learn how to bring out the best in others so you can have a positive impact, become more empowered and enrich the lives of those around you. Students must take LDR II: Leadership 101 in the Winter semester in order to complete the requirements of the INSPIRE Leadership Certificate Program.

    LDR II: Leadership 101*

    Part two of the INSPIRE Leadership Certificate Program which must be taken after completing LDR: Leadership 100 in the Fall semester. The curriculum will challenge and engage you as you strive for academic success.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 104: Differential Calculus for Business, Economics, Social Sciences

    Study of derivatives and rates of exchange, exponential and trigonometric functions, Newton's method, Taylor series, maxima and minima, and graphing.

    MATH 105: Integral Calculus for Business, Economics and the Social Sciences

    This course examines the concept of Integrals, Areas and Distances, The Definite Integral, The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Indefinite Integrals and the Net Change Theorem, The Substitution Rule. Applications of integration, Areas between Curves, Volume, Volumes by Cylindrical Shells, Techniques of integration, Integration by Parts, Trigonometric Integrals, Trigonometric Substitution, Applications of integration to Economics and Biology.

    MATH 110: Differential Calculus I

    Functions, derivatives of basic functions, and implicit differentiation. CCC MATH 110 + CCC MATH 111 = CCC MATH 104.

    MATH 111: Differential Calculus II

    Applications of differentiation including optimization problems, curve sketching, and anti-derivatives.

    MATH 200: Differential Calculus for Engineering & Physical Sciences

    Fundamentals of differential calculus and how to use derivatives in problem solving; several kinds of functions and some of their properties, e.g. growth and decay, maxima and minima, stationary points.

    MATH 230: Introduction to Finite Mathematics

    This course develops an understanding of fundamental mathematical concepts from elementary number theory, elementary probability & statistics, and elementary geometry. It develops facility with fundamental mathematical practices such as problem solving, identifying patterns, using models, and reasoning and communicating. The course focuses on developing a healthy attitude about mathematics and the confidence to learn and do mathematics beyond this course.

    MATH 099: Pre-Calculus II

    This first-year course is designed to prepare students for calculus courses by teaching them to give the definition of a function; to list some basic properties of functions in general; and to distinguish several types of elementary functions, draw their graphs, list their properties and apply those properties in problem solving.

  • Music

    MUSC 110: Music History Pre-1700

    ThiscourseisanintroductiontothehistoryofWesternmusicfromAntiquitytothe Baroque period. The course begins with a short survey of the basics of musical notation and terminology, and then covers the history of music through the development of musical genres and styles, such as Gregorian chant and opera, while also considering the music in its religious, political and social settings. Students will learn how to aurally identify and describe a wide variety of music from this period. Musical background is not required.

  • Philosophy

    ASTR 210: Exploring the Universe: The Solar System

    A survey of discoveries about the planets and other objects in the solar sytem, without the use of advanced mathematics. The solar system, the existence of planets around other stars, and the search for life.

    PHIL 101: Greek Philosophy from Pre-Socratics to Aristotle

    An introduction to some of the central philosophical problems examined in their historical development from the Pre-Socratic philosophers to Aristotle. Some of the topics examined are: the nature of philosophical inquiry, the problem of human knowledge, the nature of the soul, being and reality, basic issues in moral and political philosophy.

    PHIL 102: Philosophy from Post-Aristotelic Period to Early Medieval

    An introduction to some of the central philosophical problems examined in their historical development from the Post-Aristotelic schools of philosophy to John Scotus Eriugena. Some of the topics examined are: characteristics of Hellenistic philosophy; Roman philosophy; Neoplatonism; the relationship between Revelation and philosophy as seen by the Fathers of the Church; the early Medieval attempts to lay the foundation for a Christian philosophy.

    PHIL 103: Introduction to Philosophy

    This first-year course is a historical, problem-oriented introduction to philosophy encompassing four major areas of philosophical inquiry: the philosophy of religion, the philosophy of mind, the theory of knowledge, and ethical theory.

    PHIL 104: Critical Thinking

    An introduction to philosophical reasoning intended to improve a student’s ability to analyze and evaluate the arguments and assertions commonly met in everyday life. This course focuses on the informal logic of everyday language (the semantics of natural language) but includes some training in elementary formal logic.

    PHIL 131: Introduction to Ethics

    Students will consider the meaning and justification of moral claims by critically examining various perspectives on whether morality has an objective basis. Students will be introduced to the standard theories of ethical conduct and will learn to apply these theories to contemporary moral problems.

    PHIL 201: History of Philosophy from Later Middle Ages to 16th Century

    This course is an introduction to some of the central philosophical problems examined in their historical development from the 1lth century to the Late Renaissance. Some of the topics examined are: the formation of Scholasticism; the problem of universals; the relationship between faith and reason as seen by St. Bonaventure, St. Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and Ockham; the spirit of the Renaissance, with a special emphasis on philosophy of nature.

    PHIL 202: History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant

    This course will cover the history of modern philosophy—roughly the period that extends from the Renaissance through to Emmanuel Kant (1724-1804). We shall discuss figures such as Descartes, Locke, Hume, and Kant, and concentrate mainly on epistemological and metaphysical issues.

    PHIL 203: Philosophy of Religion

    A topical introduction to the philosophy of religion examining the nature and attributes of God, the classical and contemporary cosmological, teleological, and ontological arguments that have been proposed for and against the existence of God, the problem of evil as it is found in its evidential form, and the relation between faith and reason.

    PHIL 217: Philosophy of the Human Person

    This course introduces students to some of the central problems of philosophy in a study of what it is to say that human beings are persons and have freedom and subjectivity.

    PHIL 218: Philosophy and Consumer Culture

    This course investigates the social, historical and philosophical causes and consequences of technological consumer culture. It takes up the ageless questions concerning the meaning of life and puts them to an age unprecedented in its proximity to the possibility of human extinction. What does it mean to be human at a time when all things, including humanity, seem disposable?

    PHIL 220: Metaphysics

    This course offers an introductory treatment of traditional themes in metaphysics, which can be defined as the most general investigation possible into the nature of reality. Using classical and contemporary readings, students will study the following: the mind-body problem, the nature of space and time, determinism, freedom and fatalism, theories of reality, causation, personal identity, the nature and existence of God, and theories of truth.

    PHIL 231: Business Ethics

    This course is an introduction to Business Ethics—the critical, structured examination of the morality of practices and decision-making processes by people and institutions in the world of commerce. The course emphasizes both the philosophical foundations of ethical conduct and the practical problems encountered in the day-to-day transactions of business affairs. Using actual case studies, students will learn about various ethical and meta-ethical theories, and will apply them in standard business contexts—such as employer-employee relations, working conditions, occupational and product safety, environmental protection, and multinational operations.

  • Physics

    PHYS 101: Physics I

    Vibrations and Waves, Simple Harmonic Motion, introduction to basic Conservation laws, rotational motion, the wave equation, wave superposition and interference, the dynamics of sound, fluid motion, light and heat energy (time permitting).

    PHYS 119: Physics I Lab

    (None)

    PHYS 100: Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Heat

    An introduction to fundamental physics concepts such as force, energy, momentum, and the use of graphs and vectors in physics. Topics include mechanics, heat, and electricity.

  • Political Science

    POLI 101: Challenges in Contemporary Canadian Politics

    An introduction to Canadian politics including the function of the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial levels. Topics examined include political economy in Canada, federal-provincial relations, Quebec and separatism, and Canadian political parties.

    POLI 201: International Politics

    An introduction to the principal issues in international politics.

    POLI 210: Environmental Politics

    This course analyzes the political dimensions of the reciprocal influence between Canadian society and its environment. The values that form the bases for different positions in debates on environmental issues are examined. Canadian environmental policy is compared to that of other countries.

    POLI 220: Politics of the Arctic

    The Arctic seabed contains a treasure trove of natural resources, such as oil fields, natural gas, and iron ore becoming more accessible as the ice covering melts permanently. Five Arctic nations, Canada predominant, are claiming the right to exploit. This course examines the contested nature of political sovereignty. There are disputes among states over just where the precise boundaries lie. Some of the disputes that will be considered involve the Beaufort Sea, the Northwest Passage and the Arctic Seabed. What positive contribution could the Canadian government make to ensure that the Arctic remains peaceful? Non-governmental institutions could play a beneficial role. While some political actors view the Arctic primarily as a source of natural resources, the same region is the home of aboriginal people. Which policy alternatives will best prepare the Inuit and other Canadian aboriginals to take advantage of climate change in the Arctic?

    POLI 230: Government & Politics of the U.S.

    This course fosters informed decision by examining the political system of the United States and covers all the major institutions and processes in American politics and government: Congress, the presidency, the courts, federalism, political parties, elections, interest groups, the media, political values and culture, public opinion and public policy-making.

    POLI 240: Foundations of Western Political Thought

    Basic ideas of political thought are analyzed in this course by following the development of citizenship, a vital element of democracy. Should the duties and rights of citizens be minimized to achieve greater individual freedom? How would a definition of citizenship including the experiences and contributions of women and men influence democracy? What obligations do citizens have to future generations and other inhabitants of planet Earth? On what ethical framework should the judgments and actions of citizens be founded? Discussion will be in light of the writings of eminent theorists, such as Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, Burke, Locke, Pope Leo XIII, Machiavelli, Maistre, Maritain, Mill, Rousseau, and Wollstonecraft.

    POLI 100: Modern Western Politics

    An overview of the main themes in political science and international relations.

  • Psychology

    PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology II

    An introduction to psychological theories and research methods related to motivation, emotion, intelligence, personality, human development, stress, social psychology, psychopathology and therapy.

    PSYC 201: Research Methods in Psychology

    This 2nd-year course is an introduction to the diverse methods that are used in psychological research, with an emphasis on common errors of judgment, measuring psychological constructs, analyzing data, and writing research reports.

    PSYC 202: Analysis of Behavioural Data

    Introduces behavioral data analysis; use of inferential statistics in psychology and conceptual interpretation of data; experimental design (laboratory, field research methods); presentation of data analyses in reports.

    PSYC 205: Psychology of Child Development

    The course explores human development from conception to middle childhood. A major focus is on the various physical, cognitive and emotional factors that influence development in complex ways. Topics include major theoretical issues and research methods, prenatal development and birth, physical development throughout childhood, development of cognition and language, socialization, and personality.

    PSYC 100: Introduction to Psychology I

    This course introduces students to psychological theories and research methods, as well as current findings relating to the brain and nervous system, consciousness, sensation, perception, learning, memory, thinking and language.

  • Religious Studies

    ASTR 210: Exploring the Universe: The Solar System

    A survey of discoveries about the planets and other objects in the solar sytem, without the use of advanced mathematics. The solar system, the existence of planets around other stars, and the search for life.

    RELG 101: Introduction to the Old Testament

    This course introduces students to the literature and major themes of the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) with an emphasis on its ancient Near Eastern context. Through the study of representative primary texts, the course familiarizes students with methods and issues in the modern study of the Old Testament. The course provides useful background for further studies in religion and theology.

    RELG 102: Introduction to the New Testament

    The New Testament is an integral source for understanding and contextualizing the mission of Jesus as well as understanding the theological heritage of the Church. Understanding the New Testament authors, their methods of communication, and their historical contexts, is the first step before any application of these texts may take place. This course gives students an appreciation for the New Testament as an early and developing witness to a faith in Christ. The focus of the course is to acquire skills to do textual exegesis and understand historical factors that shaped the New Testament's origins.

    RELG 200: Modern Catholic Social Teaching

    “Who is my neighbor?” How history, economics, politics, science and religion affect our personal, social, global and cosmic relationships.

    RELG 201: Themes in Scripture

    This course is an introduction and entry into both the Christian and the Jewish Scriptures via selected key themes. Each theme will be studied in its own historical and literary contexts as the foundation for meaning, but also be compared across beyond historical boundaries into contemporary contexts. Attention will be given to gaining a basic understanding of responsible and historically informed interpretation of these books, as well as the role of the variety of sources and perspectives that inform them. Attention will be given to a Catholic approach to these texts as a compass, as well as to how different traditions approach the issues raised in thematic study.

    RELG 202: Early Christian Writings

    A survey of Patristic Writing from the Apostolic Fathers to the Fifth Century: Didache, Pastor of Hermas, Clement's Epistles, Ignatius of Antioch's Epistles, Justin Martyr, Tertullian, Origen, Lives of the Martyrs, Desert Fathers, Cappedochians, John Chrysostom, Cyprian, Augustine.

    RELG 207: World Religions

    Introduction to the major religions of the world, including Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism.

    RELG 209: Major Shapers of the Christian Tradition (Ignatius of Loyola to Merton)

    This course will examine several major figures who significantly influenced the Christian tradition from the sixteenth century to the present. It will place them in their historical context and study key features of their thought. These figures will include Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, Francis de Sales and Jane de Chantal, François de Fénelon, Cardinal Newman and Thomas Merton.

    RELG 212: Near Eastern Myths and the Hebrew Bible

    This course introduces students to Mesopotamian mythology and the scriptures of Judaism. This will be achieved through introductions to, and reading representative selections from, ancient Near Eastern mythology and the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). Attention will be given to comparisons between these texts, as well as parallel and interpretive literature.

    RELG 230: Protestant History and Thought

    This course is designed to survey and explore a number of relevant issues on the origins of Protestant thought and social engagement. The selections of assignments, questions and sources may vary from year to year.

    RELG 240: Explorations in Catholicism

    This course deals with a number of relevant issues on the sources, method and selected major themes in Catholic Thought. The selections of themes and examples vary from year to year.

  • Social Justice and Peace Studies

    SJPS 228: Human Rights Violations: Voices from the Margins

    The study of selected stories of marginalized peoples in order to gain a better understanding of oppression, poverty, and trauma from the inside. This course introduces students to human rights violations and social injustice both globally and locally through first-hand literary accounts.

    SJPS 240: Social Issues in Education

    This course introduces students to a number of socioeconomic factors that influence the performance of educational institutions. The social factors to be studied will be family economic issues, educational policies, crime, and allocation of resources. The assumption of this course is that before considering a career in education one needs to examine the social issues which inform educational practices. One of the goals of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to make comparisons between different societies and how they respond to various social challenges. This course is intended to engage students by providing a direct immersion experience where they are forced to examine the social issues which influence how schools can function.

    SJPS 111: Social Justice and Peace Studies: An Introduction

    This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and practices of social justice and peace in local and global contexts. Focusing on events, movements, figures, theories, and texts of the twentieth century, students will examine the realities of injustice and the various strategies for social change, equality, and peace that have emerged in response. Some of these include human rights declarations, truth and reconciliation commissions, non-violent resistance techniques, politics of recognition, and practices of ethical responsibility.

  • Sociology

    SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology: Power, Institutions and Social Change

    Introduction to problems in the analysis of social structures and processes. Basic sociological concepts will be introduced and their application demonstrated in various areas of sociology.

    SOCI 110: Homelessness & Downtown Eastside

    This is an interdisciplinary course that examines issues such as mental illness, addiction, social housing, policing and health care policy in such neighbourhoods as Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Students will be required to complete ten hours of volunteer work with agencies that minister to persons who are marginalized.

    SOCI 203: Social Issues Communication

    Through this course, students will sociologically examine selected global social issues and how they are communicated in a religious and moral context: religious freedom and plurality; the divide between the secular and religion; women's issues; abortion and euthanasia; just war doctrine; and globalization. Students will start by examining different sociological accounts on these matters, and will enter in dialogue with the teachings of the Catholic Church as well as that from other religious perspectives including Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam. In-class debates will allow to grasp the many arguments on each side of the debates, with their strong and weak points. Concluding remarks will be made from the standpoint of sociology of knowledge.

    SOCI 211: Religion and Society in Canada

    A historical and sociological introduction to religious behaviour and the organization of religion in Canada.

    SOCI 240: Social Issues in Education

    This course introduces students to a number of socioeconomic factors that influence the performance of educational institutions. The social factors to be studied will be family economic issues, educational policies, crime, and allocation of resources. The assumption of this course is that before considering a career in education one needs to examine the social issues which inform educational practices. One of the goals of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to make comparisons between different societies and how they respond to various social challenges. This course is intended to engage students by providing a direct immersion experience where they are forced to examine the social issues which influence how schools can function.

    SOCI 100: Introduction to Sociology: The Human Person, Society and Power

    Introduction to problems in the analysis of social structures and processes. Basic sociological concepts will be introduced and their application demonstrated in various areas of sociology.

  • Spanish

    SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II

    This course builds up on the skills learned in SPAN 101. Students will continue to develop their proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing while further exploring the Spanish-speaking culture. At this level, students will feel more at ease using Spanish during class time. They will continue to participate in pairs or group interactions and class discussions in an engaging, amusing environment.

    SPAN 201: Intermediate Spanish I

    This course builds up on the skills learned in SPAN 102. Students will continue to develop their proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing at an intermediate level while further exploring the Spanish-speaking culture. Students are highly encouraged to communicate exclusively in Spanish during class time and are required to actively participate in group interaction and class discussions in an engaging, amusing environment.

    SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish II

    This course continues to build up on the skills learned in SPAN 201. At this level, translation is introduced. Reading, writing, listening and oral communication are considerably complex at this level. The focus continues to be in oral communication at a more advanced level and students will only use Spanish to work in pairs/groups and complete tasks. Oral and written discussions of selected readings and Latin American issues are also introduced at this level. Learning is done in an interactive and amusing environment.

    SPAN 101: Introduction to Spanish I

    Spanish 101 is an introductory course to the fundamentals of the Spanish language. Students are required to work in pairs/groups to complete simple communicative tasks. This course includes simple grammatical explanations followed by group interactions for practice of the newly acquired vocabulary and grammar in an engaging, amusing environment.

  • Others

    ENVH 150: Integral Ecology

    (None)